Posts Tagged ‘ Apple vs. Android ’

In Defense of Windows Phone 7

 

tl;dr

For the time being, WP7 is underpowered, lacks developer support and is still behind in features we’ve come to expect as standard. But if you don’t care about apps (besides Angry Bird) or having the fastest phone money can buy and just want a gorgeous interface to stay connected, take occasional photos and just keep things simple, you’re in for a treat. If you have a smartphone (or if you’re on a computer) and want to try out the WP7 experience, just click here.

 

The phone space has become a battleground between Android and iOS. Android owns over half of the industry and iOS is raking dough and dominating mindshare like nobody’s business. This isn’t exactly the most fertile ground to sow your seeds but you’ve gotta plant something if you ever wanted to grow. Playing the part of the little Charlie Brown tree in between two mighty evergreens is little Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7. But it could be worse for Microsoft, just ask Nokia and RIM. So, what chance does Microsoft stand to enter this mature (by tech standards) industry? Quite a bit actually. Windows Phone 7 came like a breath of fresh air to the smartphone OS space. As much as people like to fight over Android vs. iOS, they’re actually very similar operating systems when you look at the side by side. They have the same app layout, marginally different page layouts and besides widgets and more customization on the Android front, the differences pretty much end there. But you’re not gonna see Microsoft in court defending its OS any time soon. The Metro UI tile layout is a first and it accomplishes three things very well; It’s simple, eloquent and informative all at once. The hubs are also unique (although ICS is cozying up to the design) and they provide full information in a weird but interesting partial page layout. Microsoft has really created something from the ground up that they can claim to be 100% their own. You really have to give it a chance. But enough with the flattery, WP7 has quite a few knocks against it as well. First of all, it’s the new kid on the block. The phones coming out on the Windows front aren’t the highest end models the OEMs churn out and carriers don’t exactly place them front and center. WP7 also lacks any mentionable developer community. If Microsoft want to ever get this thing off the ground, it definitely needs the right stuff. Hoping to mend these issues, Microsoft has partnered with Nokia to be the sole software provider of future Nokia phones. This might sound strange seeing as neither companies have strong marketshare but it’s actually quite a brilliant strategy… although not immune to failure. Nokia used to be the premier phone maker until the smartphone era came. Since then they’ve floundered through OS’s (Symbian, Maemo, back to Symbian, then MeeGo) without finding anything that stuck. But even through this tumultuous time they’ve been praised for their hardware design, exactly what WP7 has to bring to the table.  Nokia also retains a strong market presence in Europe that will undoubtedly help propel WP7 into the hearts and minds of developers. This is only the hope though, and things aren’t coming to a solid start. The first phone to come out of the alliance, the Lumia 800, left reviewers both astonished and appalled. The design is a beautiful unibody structure that looks great and feels great in the hand but that’s where the flattery ends. The screen is a tiny 3.7 inches and a lowly 480 x 800 pixels, it’s running on a measly 1.4 Ghz single core processor, it has just 512 megs of ram and the camera is an outdated 5MP Carl Zeiss lens. These feature  read like a dream a year ago when they were introduced with the N9 but in a market where two moths is midlife crisis there isn’t a good excuse for releasing rebranded internals. Of course, there was a push to get something out the door by holidays 2011 so there’s still hopes that Nokia will wow us early next year. For the time being, WP7 is underpowered, lacks developer support and is still behind in features we’ve come to expect as standard. But if you don’t care about apps (besides Angry Bird) or having the fastest phone money can buy and just want a gorgeous interface to stay connected, take occasional photos and just keep things simple, you’re in for a treat. If you wanna give it a shot for free, just click here (preferably on a handheld).


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