Archive for the ‘ Windows 8 ’ Category

Android, Jellybean and What we can expect next from Google

These past three weeks have been jam-packed with OS news. First Mountain Lion reared its face back mid february then Microsoft released the highly anticipated Windows 8 consumer preview to the public. These new softwares from the tech titans of silicon valley show us not only what’s coming later this year but the direction they’re taking computing. For once Apple is the less interesting of the two, presenting an OS that’s just more of an incremental step closer to bridging the iOS/OSX gap. Windows on the other hand is coming in packing a completely new OS with Windows 8. The desktop we’ve all come to know and love has taken a backseat to a more Windows Phone 7-eque metro tile screen. This new interface makes windows more walled, adds an app store and, most importantly, finally makes Windows finger-friendly.

                                

But in all this buzz, one major player is still left out. Google has for over a year now been trying to sell us on the idea of a Chrome OS without any success. Sure, they’ve come down in price but at the end of the day they still leave people asking, “why don’t I just install Chrome?” But, Google has seen nothing but good results when it comes to their Android mobile OS. In light of the major plays by both Cupertino and Redmond, Google may just have just had their hands forced. Putting Android on a laptop would make for a lightweight OS that, with the inclusion of the Android market, would be more than capable of performing most common tasks such as writing documents, browsing the web, playing music and light gaming. And because Google licenses Android for free, a mobile version could be priced competitively against Microsoft’s offerings and still keep all the revenue from searches and Android Market purchases.

So what’s the hold up? Well, Google still has a lot of work to do before they’re ready to enter the laptop market. First of all, Android on tablets is a hot mess. Samsung, by far the largest seller of Android tablets, had to admit during Mobile World Congress that their tablet  sales were less than steller. The biggest reason is most likely because Android isn’t micromanaged enough. It’s closing in on half a year since Ice Cream Sandwich was released and we’re still only seeing it on select devices. While this is a nuisance for smartphone owners, it’s a deal breaker in the high-end market. If Google wants to be a respected player on the laptop front, they’re going to need to be able to give people the peace of mind that their $400+ investment will be supported for 2-3 years at least.

This may just be speculation but with the way the market is going I don’t think Google has a choice unless they want to kill off the Chromebook experiment. For now, we just have to hold our breath and wait to see what’s coming down the road with Jellybean.

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Top 5 Assets of Windows 8

Over the last week I’ve been giving Windows 8 Developer’s edition a test drive and I wanted to share my experience so far. This post is written with the fact that this is only a developer’s preview. Not all features are working yet, there are some bugs and implementation needs work but let’s keep in mind that Microsoft has at least a year (based on previous dev. editions) to get everything fixed and polished. So, without further ado, here are the top 5 reasons Microsoft could hit a home run with Windows 8.

1) It’s gorgeous!

Let”s face it, Microsoft hasn’t had the best track record for making beautiful products but with 8, they’ve come a long long way towards that goal. From the moment you turn it on, you get his beautiful splash screen that shows the time and your choice of background. Once you get into Metro UI, that’s when 8 really shines. I’ve always been a fan of windows 7 tile theme and to see it on the big laptop screen just makes it look all the better. It’s minimalistic, breathtaking and functional all at once. If you need to know the weather, check your emails and notifications or any other information, you just need to glance at the tiles. But the appeal isn’t just skin deep, even the oldest and most utilitarian of windows programs (I’m looking at you Task Bar) gets a makeover. This deep integration of Metro UI into Windows 8 is gonna be paramount to 8’s success.

2) Tablets!

Another area apple has taken the lead over Microsoft in. The only response windows has had so far was to put windows 7 on tablets but, as we’ve learned time and time again, it just doesn’t work. A tablet isn’t even at half the power of laptops and desktops yet so everything runs slowly or not at all. With tablet ownership is growing at a faster rate than all other PC’s, you can’t consider a tablet UI as secondary. And 8 definitely gets that right. Metro UI is beautiful, finger friendly and easy to learn. Even in it’s beta, I’d put it head and shoulders above Honeycomb (based solely on looks and implementation since 8 obviously doesn’t have the same selection of apps available as android).

3) Integrated

This is what 8 is all about. Microsoft doesn’t want two separate UI’s for it’s big screen products but wants to unify both under one roof. The outcome looks good so far and if they can make sure that both Metro UI and the traditional desktop get the attention they need, They’ll do just fine.

4) Apps (programs for the windows user of all of us)

The iPad’s monopoly is based almost entirely on the app selection that you just can’t get elsewhere. But this tactic is taken straight out of Microsoft’s playbook. Because of the integration, and he fact that 8 will have  a built in base of 400 million plus users, there’s gonna be a large incentive for developers to build for windows instead of Honeycomb (or ice cream) and maybe even iOS.

5) It’s unique

This is the reason that I’ve always been a fan of windows phone 7. If you’ve payed any attention to the big Apple/Samsung wars, you’ll have realized that iOS and Android have a lot of similarities (I’m not saying I agree with apple or that they should win, especially in light of the recent discovery that apple Photoshopped Samsung’s devices to look more similar to theirs.. but more on that later). Metro UI’s tile layout is unlike anything else out there and it’s still beautiful and functional. But that wasn’t enough to help Windows Phone 7 so Microsoft doesn’t exactly have an easy home run on its hands. But 8 amends some of Windows Phone 7’s woes with it’s built in library of programs (and shorter name).

Although, from what I’ve seen, Windows 8 isn’t perfect, It’s definitely the best update from either Microsoft or Apple in years (I’m looking at you Lion). It’s combination of sex appeal, performance and programs/app selection make for a winning OS that’s definitely worth following (and eventually purchasing